Biology essay
1. Which article in your opinion was of more scientific merit? Why? Be sure to use concrete examples from the articles to support your claims. The article 2 was more scientific merit. Because, the article provides evidences using another resources or references and was broken down into more simplistic explanation and concepts. It answers the question to the topic about the Moth's evolution. For example: ''The change in colour of the peppered moth after the Industrial Revolution is a classic example of evolution in action.'' According to Truth in Science. (2015), ''More recently, Dr. Majerus (Majerus, M. 2004) presented some of his findings at a scientific conference, with more convincing evidence demonstrating that natural selection can be due to predation by birds.'' 2. Which article did you find more compelling? Why? Again, be sure to use concrete examples from the articles to support your claims. Again, article 2 is the more compelling. Because it tells you all the parts of the article, like the ''The peppered moth story only involves small scale change'' , ''The experiments behind the peppered moth story are known to be flawed'', ''Conclusion'' and most importantly the ''bibliography'' to support the topic. Using evidences and credible sources. 3. Both articles cite other sources, how does this impact your opinion of the merit/credibility of the articles? How does the source of the article impact your perception of its merit? Yes, both articles cite other resources, but not both of them answers the topic question of ''evolution'' rather Article 1: The Peppered Moth - An Update by Kenneth Miller, talks about proving if peppered moth story is "faked," or is "known to be wrong." and instead of providing a credible resources, it provided a background reading instead. It impacts my perception, because it seems to me that, ''background reading''doesn't give me the assurance of resources credibility. 4. A compelling argument can sometimes lack scientific merit, what are some strategies you can employ to avoid being "taken in" by a compelling, but not an accurate argument? Consider here other arguments you come across in your daily life - commercials for products, advertisements for diet pills, etc. I would avoid being taken in by a compelling, but not an accurate argument by looking for credible resources to be able to check if the resources is legit and accurate. For example on commercials like good beauty products they say, you will never find out if you don't know who made it? where it came from? or how it's made? If I won't be able to find all of that, then I won't be able to consider it good as I can't find any good information to trust that company who advertise them from. Truth in Science. (2015). The peppered moth. https://www.truthinscience.org.uk/content.cfm?id=3118 Majerus, M. 2004 The Peppered Moth: decline of a Darwinian Disciple. Lecture to the British Humanist Association, 12th February 2004 Allison After reading both articles the Truth in Science Peppered Moth article appeared to have more scientific information related to new discoveries about the evolution of the Peppered Moth. Some of the more concrete examples of the articles scientific explanation relate to how the light-colored pepper moths were used during the experiment in the 1950’s. The article explains the method that Kettlewell used to place light colored pepper moths for observation was based on limited information about their natural habitat. Kettlewell had to decide how to conduct his experiments with little information about the lighter color moths to guide him. He placed the moths on the wrong areas of the trees, released them at the wrong time of the day and released to many at a time. His decisions created an artificial experiment. Truth Science highlighted specific information about the background of the initial experiment above and beyond just pointing out Kettlewell did not perform his experiment correctly. (The Peppered Moth, n.d) I found the article by Truth and Science more compelling for two reasons. The first was the way the author explained what was believed as early as 1896 and tested in the 1950’s and how the hypothesis was essentially correct but the argument to support the hypothesis was not accurate. The second way was the explanation of what is needed to confirm the hypothesis going forward. (The Peppered Moth, n.d) In Ken Miller’s article, The Peppered Moth – An Update his citations are inconsistency noted throughout the article. The set-up of the article is confusing with various colors and text blocks in the middle of the article. The article had great points explaining the change in population due to pollution but for me credibility came into question based on the presentation of the material and how sources were cited. (The Peppered Moth, 1999) Citing sources has an impact on the creditability of the article if the source is credible. When reading an article, you must also look at the information cited from supporting sources. It is easy for someone to quote sources and take information out of context to create a false source of support to their argument. Or to choose sources to cite in the article that may not be a credible source. A compelling argument can be very misleading. This often happens when people want to believe information. When articles are published quoting facts and statistics without sources it should be closely scrutinized. Recent examples of this are the condo that collapsed in Florida. I have seen a barrage of articles that quote conspiracy theories that point to a government cover-up without any source cited. I’ve also seen articles posted that reference recent issues with the condo that questioned it stability with credible sources from the county sited in the article. Another article cited several sources explaining that during the 90’s the building regulations were more relaxed, and building was allowed with an improper form of sand being allowed which later began to break down the rebar which severely impacted the building’s structural reliability. COVID-19 reports over the past year have been a constant source of conversation. There are articles that again quote statistics that leave out significant pieces of data that could sway the reader if they had all the information. It is important to always look at who wrote the article, why are they credible and what are their sources. You also have an obligation to look at the sources and determine if they are credible sources. Resources The Peppered Moth. (1999, August). http://www.millerandlevine.com/km/evol/Moths/moths.html. The Peppered Moth. Truth in Science. (n.d.). https://www.truthinscience.org.uk/content.cfm?id=3118. Laura 1. Which article in your opinion was of more scientific merit? Why? Be sure to use concrete examples from the articles to support your claims. After reading both articles I felt that the article from Truth in Science “The Peppered Moth” was of more scientific merit. The reason I felt this article was of more scientific merit was because they pointed out how they had come to find that the original experiments were flawed. They pointed out what aspects of the original experiments where flawed and why. For example it was stated that in the original experiments, “Bernard Kettlewell released his moths at the wrong time of day. This meant that they were not able to settle naturally in their preferred resting site”(TruthinScience, 2021). There was another example given about student textbooks. Did you know that the photos in our textbooks that we see with moths are in fact not accurate? This is because these moths are typically not found resting on the trunk of the trees such as seen in the pictures but also the moths that are photographed are not even alive(TruthinScience, 2021). These are just two examples of why I feel that this article was of more scientific merit. 2. Which article did you find more compelling? Why? Again, be sure to use concrete examples from the articles to support your claims. Again I found the Truth in Science article more compelling. While both articles had a good opening sentence, I felt that the Truth In Science article gripped my attention slightly more than the article by Kenneth Miller. The Truth in Science article starts with, “The change in colour of the peppered moth after the Industrial Revolution is a classic example of evolution in action”(2021). This reads almost like a book to me so it grabs my attention more. I also felt that I could understand the wording better in the Truth in Science article. The article from Kenneth Miller spoke of a book called “Elephant Book”, but it was not mention until the line where he says, “As noted on page 297 of the Elephant Book…..”(1999). This left me wondering was there more that needed to be shared from this book to help get his point across. The second thing was how the two articles addressed the subject of the flawed experiments. Kenneth Miller was very quick to say that those rumors were lies and that the experiments were not flawed with very little research to back it up. However, Truth in Science admitted the experiments were flawed and even gave research to back it up. The research is what is important to me in helping me be compelled to use that article for research for a paper. 3. Both articles cite other sources, how does this impact your opinion of the merit/credibility of the articles? How does the source of the article impact your perception of its merit? The fact that both articles cite other sources means that they did their research. In my opinion this shows that the authors of the articles wanted to make sure that they had the facts that they needed to back up their claims. While I felt Kenneth Miller didn’t have as many sources or didn’t use them as well as Truth in Science, I still appreciate the fact that he did in fact go to outside sources to help support his claims. I think it is very important for any researcher to make sure that they are doing outside research because they can find something out from others that they may not have known before. This is why we do research papers in school. 4. A compelling argument can sometimes lack scientific merit, what are some strategies you can employ to avoid being "taken in" by a compelling, but not an accurate argument? Consider here other arguments you come across in your daily life - commercials for products, advertisements for diet pills, etc. When it comes to any compelling argument you need to get all of the details first. You can not just assume that the information you are given is correct and just go with it. If you do not do your research then the end results may not be good. For example using something that you would come across in your daily life retail sales. I worked in retail jewelry sales and we would often run sales saying up to a percentage off. The first thing you want to do is notice that the sale says Up to xx% off. The first mistake people make is seeing that xx% and expect the entire store to be that. Second, you need to research the products. Say the sale is up to 50% off. There will be certain products that can only be discounted up to 20% off due to vendor contracts. You want to ask questions to get all the information and not just take the sales associate’s word for it. Lastly, read the fine print. There were several collections that would be excluded from these types of sales because again of the vendor contract. Many people would come in expecting these discounts on those items then be mad when they couldn’t get them. I can’t tell you how many times I had to show people the fine print for those sales. In the end you need to do your research no matter what it is. Whether it’s research for a school paper or a sale you wish to take advantage of, do your research, gather information, compare the research and look for any fine print. Miller, K. August, 1999. The Peppered Moth- An Update. http://www.millerandlevine.com/km/evol/Moths/moths.html. Truth in Science. 2021. The Peppered Moth. https://www.truthinscience.org.uk/content.cfm?id=3118. -research paper writing service